Author Topic: Some mostly-procedural game recommendations  (Read 171 times)

Offline Misery

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Some mostly-procedural game recommendations
« on: December 23, 2016, 06:04:27 AM »
Okay, with the Steam Winter Sale in progress, I figured it's a perfect time to do this.  I've kinda been meaning to do this for some time, but am lazy, so I didn't.  But now is the time to do this.

None of these games I'll be listing and talking about in here are AAA games or other "major" titles.  Part of the point of this is showing games that you might not have heard of... the "major" games out there speak for themselves, and don't need me pointing them out.

Nearly all of these games are found on Steam.  There is one exception, but it'll be coming to Steam later.   

I'm going to list each one and provide a bit of info on it.  These games can be fully released, or in Early Access... as a rule, I tend not to care all that much.  If a game is good, then it's good... simple as that.  I am however not going to list something that's REALLY unfinished.  Anything I list here will either be finished, or so far along that it'd be indistinguishable for many players. 

I'm too lazy to do screenshots.  Look the blasted things up.   No particular order for these, either... I'm just going to list at random.  And LOTS of these games are going to be using procedural generation, since that's a thing I tend to really like in games in general (tons of replay value).  If you don't like that, well... what in the heck are you even doing here?  This is Arcen.  Everything is procedural here.  Well, almost everything.

Also, please feel free to leave your own recommendations for games here.  The whole point of this topic, after all, is to point out games that others on this forum may not know about.  What with Steam being a hideous, bloated mess currently (which is a fact that I haaaaaaaaaate, it's SO easy to miss awesome stuff right now).

Let's get started here:


Xenoraid:

Actually, rather than me rambling about this directly, I'll link you to this:  https://pcgamesnnews.wordpress.com/2016/11/15/review-xenoraid/       Which is a detailed review I wrote up for the game.  Yes, I do reviews/previews now, it's a recent thing for me.  This particular game is kinda quirky... in my case, I'm extremely picky about shmups in a general sense.  I enjoyed it, but found it to be flawed in some areas.  However, for those that aren't seriously obsessive about tiny specific bits in this genre, this might be excellent, which is exactly why I'm listing it here.  It is a very polished game by the same people who made Neon Chrome.  Quality is pretty darned high, and it's never unfair or broken.  I'd love to see some DLC for this, really.


Unexplored:

Okay, if you know me on Steam at all, you might have noticed that I never shut up about this game.   Of all of the different games I've bought over the course of this year, this might be my favorite, period.  This is a roguelike/roguelite/walrus/whatever, I hate all these bloody terms.  Let's go with "action roguelike".  As in, real-time.   This doesn't play whatsoever like Isaac though, unlike much of that genre.  This game actually adheres to a lot of traditional ideas used by the "core" roguelikes, while putting it's own twist on a lot of things.  For example, you do have unidentified items in this game.  A mechanic I normally LOATHE.  But unlike in freaking Nethack, it's actually done WELL here.  I cant even tell you how bloody rare that is.  It's done in such a way that it's not frustrating, and you can approach it in a logical fashion WITHOUT those moments that games like Nethack is where you die almost immediately because you HAVE to trial-and-error at least a couple of things and one of them killed you.  That never, ever has to happen here.  Aside from having numerous different ways of identifying things (or half-identifying, which means that it wont tell you exactly what it is, but will tell you if it's positive or negative), your character will also sometimes randomly identify something automatically when you pick it up.  I can think of one, and ONLY one other game that does this, which is another one of my favorite games of all time, and it used this very mechanic extremely well.  The most noticeable thing about this game though is the dungeon itself.  It uses "cyclic generation", which I'm not going to pretend to fully understand and wont try to explain, instead of traditional level-gen methods.  What this leads to is what is probably the best level generation I've ever seen; as I've put it elsewhere, these levels feel hand-crafted rather than procedural.  This aspect of the game is *fantastic*. And going along with that is what the game does with the concept of "locks and keys".  In traditional games, locks and keys are exactly that... a locked door, to which there is a key somewhere.  In this though, that's not the case, as it takes that idea and abstracts the hell out of it.  A "lock" might be a room full of death turrets... the "key" might be a potion of invisibility found elsewhere, allowing you to pass through that room without being vaporized.  Or perhaps you are on a floor, looking for the exit down... and find it to be totally walled off.  A bug?  No... you notice suddenly that the game has been handing you ropes, an item that lets you climb down into pits to skip down a level.  And maybe you do that, and then happen to find the stairs going back UP, entering that closed off section to find a magic whatsit inside as a reward for finding a way in there. It does this a lot, and I've never once hit a situation where I get stuck because I already used some important item.  I have no bloody clue how the game manages to prevent that from ever happening. It's very well thought out. Though, really, everything about it is... this is an extremely polished game.    Another thing to note is the combat.  This is NOT like other action roguelikes where you run into a room and kill 80 robots by firing deathrays in all directions.  Combat in this is a lot more careful and calculated (which fits the "traditional" sense of the game), with you having to be very aware of your timing, and the options available to you (as in old roguelikes, you are expected to be using things in your inventory to assist you, not just stabbing everything).  Unlike other games of this type, you can pause the action at any time to access your inventory, switch equipment, assess the situation, or whatever.  This is not a game that's going to obsess over twitch mechanics.  That being said, you still have to try to NOT get hit by enemy attacks.  This isn't the sort of action game where enemies can still "miss" you even when their attack clearly hits your character in the face.   There's tons of content here.  I have no idea how much.  I've been playing this for about 45 hours total right now and the game hasn't even run out of bosses yet (seriously, there's freaking legions of the things), let alone anything else.  This is a game with fairly long runs, and a heavy emphasis on exploring.  It is pretty difficult and there are a million different ways to die.  And loads of mechanics that I wont even go into here, because it'd take ages.   This game is in Early Access, but it's one of those where they could just stop and sell it right now if they wanted to, because it's that far along.   The developer is very friendly and interacts with the community a lot, so that's another good thing.  My random complaints get listened to.

20XX:

Okay, remember Mighty No. 9?  Which was freaking awful?  20XX is the game that they were TRYING to make.  Or that they SHOULD have made. It got right all the stuff that 9 got wrong, and it's made by TWO guys.  It is also part roguelike (yes, this is a theme with me) with procedural levels, and loads of items/powerups to find to get a build going for your character.  You'll never become invincible in this game though...  this isn't that sort of thing.  It *will* eat your face... even when you think you've powered up quite a bit.  The game overall plays exactly like the old Megaman X series.  It even gets the controls and feel exactly right, which is quite the feat.  All of the abilities that X had, are things you can do in this game (like the slide-dash, or wall climbing).  Like in those old games, there are 8 possible bosses to fight, each one giving you it's power upon defeat (all of these share the same energy meter instead of having separate ones).  The powers are varied and more importantly, actually useful.  Learning to use them properly is important.  The bosses themselves are interesting.  Their patterns and, well, everything about them increase the further along you are when you fight them.  A boss that is not too bad when fought on stage 1 could be a freaking nightmare if fought on stage 8.  There is no "optimal" route through the game, either; the first stage you go to is always chosen at random, and when a boss goes down, you then get a selection of three random others to go after.  So you're going to have to make decisions based on the situation instead of just doing the same bloody route every freaking time.  Enemies are challenging (and as with actual Megaman games, learning their patterns is super important), and there's ALOT of dangerous obstacles.  Lots of traditional elements from the old games are here, including those vanishing platforms that are so infamous.  Some powers can help you here though, as all powers have secondary effects. For example the fire-shield power completely cancels out ice spikes that are fired from traps in the ice zone; they vanish without even depleting the shield at all.  Another power has the bizarre effect of locking vanishing platforms into place if you hit them with it.  The levels are done in a similar way to certain Arcen games, in that they're made of small, pre-made "chunks" sewn together.  It's all very well-made and the levels don't get old.  One very important difference though is spikes:  They're not instant death in this game like they were in the old games.  Well... usually.  The game has ALOT of different modes, one of which allows you to set all sorts of wonky modifiers (one of which causes instant death if you hit a hazard, because why not).  This being the sort of game it is, there is perma-death.  No continues here.  Gotta GIT GUD, with this one.  I play this one quite a bit, as it's pretty much perfect for me.  And yes, there are multiple difficulty modes to pick from too.  Highly recommended, but be aware that one way or another, this game gets pretty brutal.  But considering that I'm the one making this list, would you really expect otherwise?

Cogmind:

This is the one that isn't on Steam yet (it has it's own site, you can get it from there, and it'll appear on Steam later).  It's also a turn-based roguelike.  This is a game I actually found a LONG while ago, but I couldn't play it until recently because despite the huge amount of info there was for it, it was in a closed-alpha state.  As of right now, the game is nearly complete.  It is one of the most unique and also one of the most incredibly polished turn-based roguelikes I've ever seen, with an incredible UI (and isn't THAT a rarity).  It has an ASCII mode, too, and frankly the game is gorgeous no matter what mode you're using.  I'll not go into the actual story here, but this game is all about robots.  You're a robot, the enemies are robots, everyone is a robot.  More specifically, robots which tend to... fall apart.  Your robot, and every other one, is made up of a lot of separate modules.  Core, arms, legs/wheels/floaty thing and other stuff.  Each of these takes damage separately and has different stats, and when a piece other than the core takes enough damage, it falls off.  As you get wrecked, you'll lose parts, and the idea is that you'll keep constantly rebuilding yourself by snatching up the parts of defeated foes (or various things you find lying around by themselves).  Combat tends to use a lot of ranged attacks, but you have a lot of options available to you.  And "a lot of options" is a big theme for this game.  This is an incredibly DETAILED game.  Every tiny little aspect of the game has tons of detail and possibilities stuffed into it, and there are a great many advanced mechanics to work with.  Fortunately, with the excellent UI and design, things are NOT hyper-cryptic, which is a rarity in games of this type.  You don't need a college degree to play this, despite the depth and complexity of it.  The game will not explain every freaking thing to you... no "tutorial for total idiots here", instead there's a tutorial for the basics, and then everything else in the game is designed to be learned naturally by the player.  That old element of figuring things out on your own and experimenting, just... without some of the crazed nonsense that the core roguelikes tended to have.  You know, those elements that make you go "How the hell could ANYONE figure out that bit is even there?!?".  None of that here.   Not that it'll be easy though.  The difficulty of course is very high, and you'll die a lot.  Of course.  But the actual gameplay is quite approachable and you can learn at your own speed.  Even if it's punching your ears off as you do so.


Stramium Immortaly:

Not a spelling error, that's how it's actually spelled.  I've played a lot of games in my time.  Few are as purely, ridiculously WEIRD as this one is.  It's one "WTF" moment after another.  At it's core, this is a bit Isaac-ish, in that you've got a dungeon of many rooms to explore, items to find, and bosses to fight.  The similarities end there though.  This is not an overhead view game, but instead a side-view game.  Your character flies, and much like in a shmup, you can only fire to the left or right.  No vertical fire.  This may sound restrictive, but the entire game is designed around this concept... it never becomes unfair due to this element.   This also means that you can have much distance between yourself and the enemy when you fight them.  The idea of the game is simple (and weird):  The dungeon is a bit like that of Rogue Legacy, in that it's one monstrous area, but it's sectioned off into 5 separate zones, each marked off by a different color on your map.  You can enter any of these at any time, but like in Legacy, that's not exactly the brightest idea.  Your goal is to defeat the boss of each of the four zones, and then enter the core of the dungeon to face your actual target, before making your escape.  While seeing loads of seriously strange things.  The game has ALOT of special rooms in it, which break up the pacing nicely.  The biggest dungeon type (you can choose a type before you start the game) consists of 110 rooms.  Of those 110 rooms, about, oh, 51 of them are special rooms.  That's a lot of special rooms, each one different than the last, each serving a unique purpose.  They do a very good job of keeping things interesting, and keeping them from getting stale (like in, say, Gungeon, which has hardly any special rooms and thus can feel exceedingly repetitive).  Also, the game is freaking gorgeous.  And weird, did I mention that yet?   The difficulty on this one isn't as high as it is on others in this list. It's a lot of fun though and like everything here, deserves more attention than it's getting.  Also it's very strange.


Everspace:

I'm not going to go into huge detail on this one, as this has received it's own topic on the forums here before.  But I'm listing it here as a reminder that it exists. It's gotten quite a few updates since it was last talked about on here though.  As before, this really is an excellent game.  Particularly if you like 6DoF sorts.  You know, like Descent.


Infested Planet:

This is a squad-based, asymmetric RTS (one of the sorts where you can pause and issue orders) with a few tower defense/offense elements thrown in for the heck of it.  The basic concept of the game is simple:  It's you and your team VS a seemingly endless army of bugs of all sorts.  In most missions, your goal is to destroy all of the enemy "hives", the base units that basically everything else spawns from.  There's just one problem with this:  As you destroy hives, the enemy mutates and gets crazier and more powerful (sound familiar?).  There's TONS of creative mutations that the game can pick from, each of them dangerous.  But you can also upgrade too.  During each mission you have "BP" that you can spend. You start out with a certain amount of BP, and you earn more every time a Hive goes down.  You can use this to place special structures that do things, or you can use this to upgrade your guys into different classes, each with their own unique abilities.  What's interesting about this is the game's refund system.  If you break down a placed structure, or undo one of your guys' class upgrades, you get the full amount of BP back that you spent.  This means that you can switch things out as needed, even class changes.  This may sound a bit OP on paper, but... no.  The game will still beat you over the head with your own face.  One thing about this game is that it is VERY well tuned.  I'm actually a little stunned at just how good the balance is.  There are TONS of different powers and structures on your side, and TONS of mutations on the other.  Every single one of them is capable of countering specific others.  Like, hard counters, that sort of thing.  For example there's a type of bug that can appear that has a very hard shell; it's very slow, but your basic guns do next to nothing against it unless you have a ton of guys firing at once.  However, if you use a Flamer-class soldier, they hard-counter that bug type, and can fend off entire swarms of that sort on their own.  The enemy, though, can counter your flamer with certain other things.  EVERY thing in the game has this aspect.  A huge part of the strategy is analyzing what the enemy currently has, and coming up with a combination of things and tactics that will allow you to defeat it.  And every time your carefully worked-out tactic works... well, the enemy mutates again.  Suddenly your previous strategy may be null and void.  It's rather like in AI War where there's generally no easy "cleanup" phase to a mission... it just keeps getting harder and more complicated.   And as I mentioned, there are towers.  The game doesn't focus on these, but they are structures you can place anywhere at all (like with all structures), and can be used both offensively and defensively.  The enemy also has towers, and yes, you absolutely will have to walk right into their range.  Now you get to see how THAT feels.  One aspect of this game that I really, really like is that the game actually expects you to be splitting up your squad properly, assigning the right number of dudes to the right task.  In ALOT of squad-based games out there, you pretty much never split up your guys, making them feel more like one rather bizarre single distributed character that takes up an odd amount of space.  Not so here.  You'll be attacked on all fronts and have to deal with many things at once.    The game features a basic campaign, which is fun enough, but I *strongly* recommend getting the expansions with this one.  One of them adds a very unique procedural campaign mode, which plays very, very differently from the other in terms of what happens on the map screen.  It's easily my favorite part of the game, and one of my favorite strategy-game experiences, period.  But you do need the expansion for this.  This also adds in new mission types that the default game doesn't have, which switch things up quite nicely.  Really, this is an excellent strategy game, and it goes right up there with AI War and Creeper World as one of my absolute favorites.  Endless replay value here, and many difficulty modes; you can get something out of this even if you feel that you're not very good at these.
« Last Edit: December 23, 2016, 06:21:56 AM by Misery »

Offline Draco18s

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Re: Some mostly-procedural game recommendations
« Reply #1 on: December 23, 2016, 10:44:57 AM »
+1 for Cogmind.  I got it back during like...Alpha 5 or 6.
* Draco18s checks email
No...I got it waaay back during Alpha 3, possibly Alpha 2. Either way, I participated in the Alpha 3c competition (I didn't win anything, but it was fun).  Did a run the other day (Alpha 11 is current) just to get my name back up on the leaderboards.

Offline TheVampire100

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Re: Some mostly-procedural game recommendations
« Reply #2 on: December 23, 2016, 11:43:37 AM »
Okay, here are some of mine.

Notrium: Very old one, it's part randomly generated and partly there is constant stuff. You crash on an alien infected planet and want to escape. You can craft various tools to survive or salvage equipment from other crashed ships. The game is quite old but still good.

Subnautica: Partly procedured generated, while the terrain and the world might look different, the biomes are, as far as I understand, always on the same spots. But how the biomes are generated is random. Also the location of wreckages is always random and THIS is the important part of the game because most of the time you spend searching for wreckages because you need new blueprints for equipment. Otherwise you cannot explore deeper intot he ocean.

Offline Misery

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Re: Some mostly-procedural game recommendations
« Reply #3 on: December 25, 2016, 03:25:19 AM »
Ya know what, I'm going to go ahead and recommend Hero Siege too, for anyone that likes ARPGs.   Quite a lot more to this game than I originally thought there would be, and the combat is just superb.  As I've stated elsewhere, it's like Diablo ate Robotron.  With a bit of Isaac in there too, as while you have your typical piles of equipment with all sorts of stats and special traits, there are also Isaac-style special items called Relics, both passive and active (can only hold one active at a time, as expected) to grab too.   Though, coming with that is a bloody awful death penalty, in that if you die, you lose ALL of your Relics.  They don't just drop on the ground or anything either, they're just gone.  It's a funky system, sort of a bizarre half-permadeath, but it really makes you want to be careful about avoiding nasty things.  Particularly traps, they do *a lot* of damage, and many of them bounce or roam around.  The worst thing is getting frozen by some enemy attack (arrrgh) and while you cant move, some giant spiked ball or whatever runs you over, SPLAT, end of story, ugh.  But the game DOES expect you to pay attention and avoid stuff, so this makes sense here.  I'm glad it lets me use a controller.  Typical ARPG mouse controls seriously wouldn't work here, at least not for me.

Also I hate the freaking maggots.  I've mentioned THAT elsewhere too.  But it bears repeating.  Elite versions are even worse.

Offline TheVampire100

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Re: Some mostly-procedural game recommendations
« Reply #4 on: December 25, 2016, 04:05:04 AM »
I've tried out Straimium Immortaly and 20xx.

Straimium Immortaly: Nope, not my game, not even close. It's too close to Isaac and I HATE this game so much. It's basically Isaac in Sideview for me. Nothign I would like. I refunded it after I played only for a small time around. Might not be enough to judge the whole game but that's simple how Steams Refund system works.

20xx: Now THIS is more my cup of tea. I'm a really big fan of Mega Man. I'm nor really that good at these games but that didn't stop me to play them over and over and over and fail a bazillion times. I actually could beat some of them and in others I got at least to the final level or final boss. This thing is AMAZING. It's liek someone took the classic Mega Man and made a rogue-like of it. I cannot believe someone thought of that and I cannot believe that someone didn't thought of it until now!
Didn't finish a single game so far, 10/10, would die again!


Soem other games I want to mention here that I have already a little longer:

Subterrain: Nice little survival game with procedural elements. You are the last living human on a mars colony, everyone else has mutated to bizarre monsters. The endgame goal is to reach the launchpad and escape from mars, unfortunately you are also infected with whatever has mutated the other colonists. To fight the infection you have to salvage medicaments or make them yourself. You also have to keep up your basic needs like food, water, even the need to pee. Time is an important factor in the game, everythign you do takes time. Over time the infection in the colony increases and there will be more enemies in the different areas, they might also mutate into stronger forms if you take too long. You can kill mutants to keep the infection low.
A main aspect of the game is to manae the big reactor of the colony because if it gets destroyed, the whole power shuts down and you die in there.
The game features crazy amounts of content, you can grab everythign and bring it to your base (which is the reactor room), where you can disassamble them for resources that you can spend on crafting your tools. You can also scan objects to recreate them. While the location of the areas and main aspects stay the same (for example the position of story relevant objects), the layout of the maps is randomly generated.
The game features a tense atmosphere, it is not quite horror but it is very close.

Sunless Sea: A story driven game from the designers fo Fallen London, a text adventure browser game. Fallen london was one of the best received brwoser games ever, the game features a thick and deep lore that stretches far out.
Sunless Sea is a Spin Off. You sail with your boat on a dark underground ocean known as the Unterzee. This eldritch world seems to defy natural laws. You set your own goal at the start of the game, you can choose between different paths, for example treasures or fame. The core gameplay lets you sail around multiple isles on the Unterzee and dock at different ports. every ports features a varity of stories, what stories you get is randomly decided but some factors may influence what exactly you get.
You can fight monsters or priates ont he ocean and if you like also civil ships for loot. However, everything you do has consequences, if you decide one thing, it might close pathes into the other direction.
You can upgrade your ship with various equipment that you get on the market, the currency for these can be obtained from trading, quests or looting other ships.
The map is randomly generated each game, the map is divided in different cards that are shuffeled with each new session. Some cards always stay at the same position, for example London is always int he center of the left edge on the map.
The game has also a DLC called Zubmariner that lets you dive underwater and discover wrecks of ships, ruins and other stuff. And you will encounter new monsters of course.

Space Run Galaxy: Unlike the first game in the series, Galaxy features procedural generated levels. The only thing that always stays the same are the bosses. Space Run Galaxy is a special Tower Defense game where you play an express courier in space. You deliver goods for your customers to different systems. The game has nearly unlimited replayability but is also a little grindy because you now need resources to buy new towers. It's still a good game in my opinion.

Offline Misery

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Re: Some mostly-procedural game recommendations
« Reply #5 on: December 25, 2016, 07:22:26 AM »
Oh yes, 20XX is pretty freaking great, aint it?   That they got the controls and overall feel of it just right constantly amazes me.  Though the high difficulty will put some people off, it's quite a bit harder than the old Megaman games ever got.   Particularly if you fight certain bosses too late.  Most specifically, don't fight Eternal Star too late if you can avoid it.  If you see that boss pop up as an option in the early game, go after him immediately, wether you want his power or not (though his power IS useful, it can fire through walls, but it's very awkward to aim).   Also go after Vile Visage early.  Otherwise you get "bullet hell Megaman" with that guy.   Though pretty much no matter what you do, the late-game bosses are going to be all sorts of mean.

The biggest things that can help you though are the armor upgrades or whatever they're called.  Things like helmet or boots, that sort.   Always go for the "Glory" rooms when you see one, as that's the only type of item those rooms can carry.  When you see the room that says "don't attack", what it actually means is just not using your basic weapon; powers only in that room.  Confused me the first time I ran into it.

Also, if you find a room with an item where the music goes all funky, DONT pick up... whatever it is.  Those are not something to mess with when learning the game.  They're like Nuclear Throne's crowns, except a lot more dangerous.  That room is pretty rare though.

Last tip:  ALWAYS explore.  Treasure chests (not the small wood or metal boxes) are always located in out-of-the-way areas.  Usually these require a lot of jumping between wonky platforms to get there.  Stores are also often in such areas.



As for the other bit, I'm going to take a guess and say that you don't like Isaac too much, then?

Offline crazyroosterman

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Re: Some mostly-procedural game recommendations
« Reply #6 on: December 25, 2016, 07:35:52 AM »
Oh yes, 20XX is pretty freaking great, aint it?   That they got the controls and overall feel of it just right constantly amazes me.  Though the high difficulty will put some people off, it's quite a bit harder than the old Megaman games ever got.   Particularly if you fight certain bosses too late.  Most specifically, don't fight Eternal Star too late if you can avoid it.  If you see that boss pop up as an option in the early game, go after him immediately, wether you want his power or not (though his power IS useful, it can fire through walls, but it's very awkward to aim).   Also go after Vile Visage early.  Otherwise you get "bullet hell Megaman" with that guy.   Though pretty much no matter what you do, the late-game bosses are going to be all sorts of mean.

The biggest things that can help you though are the armor upgrades or whatever they're called.  Things like helmet or boots, that sort.   Always go for the "Glory" rooms when you see one, as that's the only type of item those rooms can carry.  When you see the room that says "don't attack", what it actually means is just not using your basic weapon; powers only in that room.  Confused me the first time I ran into it.

Also, if you find a room with an item where the music goes all funky, DONT pick up... whatever it is.  Those are not something to mess with when learning the game.  They're like Nuclear Throne's crowns, except a lot more dangerous.  That room is pretty rare though.

Last tip:  ALWAYS explore.  Treasure chests (not the small wood or metal boxes) are always located in out-of-the-way areas.  Usually these require a lot of jumping between wonky platforms to get there.  Stores are also often in such areas.



As for the other bit, I'm going to take a guess and say that you don't like Isaac too much, then?
that all sounds kind of dope actually ill probably have a crack at that when I'm not ill any more (yeap its Christmas and I'm just typical really)
but my addition would be thea the awakening an odd mix of 4x survival with a rogue like type progression system and card game battle mechanics for now ill just say from what I've played of it that its pretty dope.
 but ill edit this and put some more substantial detail when I'm feeling more coherent.
c.r

Offline Endymion

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Re: Some mostly-procedural game recommendations
« Reply #7 on: December 29, 2016, 10:53:02 AM »
Notrium is great, I was thinking about why I loved that but most of the more recent survival games aren't that interesting to me and I think at least part of it is the way items work, in Notrium there's no item durability and you just combine and break up items without losing any of the parts, meaning that finding items is great and that you are often evaluating all your items to see if you really need them or if it'd be better to break them up and use the parts for some other item. Which feels better compared to most other survival games where all items eventually breaking down makes you care a lot less about getting them.
Also while it does have item durability, DinoSystem is a cool game similar to Notrium in many ways, it's about surviving on a random island with dinosaurs, it has a kind of realistic ecosystem simulation so you could end up destroying the ecosystem and end up with some or all dinosaurs dying.

Thea I'm kind of conflicted about, I love most of it but the UI in it has tons of minor things that annoy me(most serious one probably being that every time you leave your base or split a group you have to decide what fuel(wood pretty much always) and what 10 food types should the group get and how much of them).
Also if you care about efficiency of your resource gathering you'll end up doing a ton of math in your head or with a calculator, which some people certainly enjoy but some might not.

Also while Straimium Immortaly looks too twitch based for my liking I love it's aesthetics and dialogue, it reminds me of Vangers .

Offline Misery

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Re: Some mostly-procedural game recommendations
« Reply #8 on: December 29, 2016, 11:22:22 AM »
Stramium isn't quite as twitchy as it might appear.  As roguelikes/roguelites go it's very definitely on the easier end of the spectrum.  Most enemies aren't exactly the hardest things to defeat and you get access to LOTS of items to power up.  It gives a similar feel to Isaac in that manner.  Bullets tend to not move very fast and there are only so many of them.  This certainly isn't like Starward or Gungeon. 

Heck, I think I finished the game for the first time after like, 3 runs?   Yes I play a lot of these but I hardly ever tear through them THAT fast.